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2023 Volunteer Appreciation Month

Updated: Apr 13, 2023


In honor of April being Volunteer Appreciation Month, Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state. Here are a few of the thousands of volunteers who go above and beyond to support the future of Girl Scouts!




Heather Alden

1.      Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

Originally, I started as a troop leader so my daughter could have a troop as a Daisy. We had a very large Daisy troop - 24 girls! I wanted to offer it for as many girls as possible.


2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.


I was troop leader for that troop for two years (Daisies) and for the past two years I've been a TCM. This year I was also the SUCM.

3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?


I've learned that we have some really amazing, giving people who keep Girl Scouting alive and well across Colorado! I've also learned about the different topics the girls chose when I was a troop leader. One of my favorites was a coding badge - we made binary bracelets of each girl's name. I used this same activity at a Take Your Kids to Work day event at my job!


4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?


I hope they have learned how to be great entrepreneurs with their cookie sales, as well as how to treat people kindly and with respect.



Jessica Ramsour

1.      Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?


I became a Girl Scout volunteer because I was a Girl Scout all the way through high school and wanted my daughter to be a Girl Scout.  When I enrolled my daughter, there weren't any Daisy troops in our area so I became her troop leader, as my Mom was for me! :)


2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.


I am the Service Unit Manager for Windy Meadows, I am the Troop Leader of a Junior/Cadette troop that has 10 girls in it and I am our Troop Cookie Manager.

3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?


I have learned that the girls are more capable than we tend to give them credit for.  We started off trying to figure out how to have a girl-led troop and thought it would be very difficult but have found that the girls can figure out most things and actually don't need much assistance from us.

  

4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that the girls have learned that nothing is out of their reach if they work hard.  I really try to encourage them to try new things even if they're usure of the outcome. or if they think they will like it.



Marcy Kendall


1. Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?


I became a Girl Scout volunteer when my daughter's leader stepped down. I asked another mom to co-lead, but we had other parents rotate planning meetings that first year. After that I felt like I knew Girl Scouts well enough to do the leading and planning. I've been a leader for almost 7 years now my girls about to bridge to Seniors. 


2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.


I have been the primary leader with different adults helping me at meetings and events. I have been the cookie mom for the last few years. I have been active in the service unit as well. Another leader and I have organized the 100-girl Space Science events at the Fiske Planetarium to help those Juniors earn the Space Science badge.  


3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?


I have learned patience. I have learned that we all have different ways to lead a troop and that is okay. And more than that, it is an advantage we have that we can be flexible in so many ways making it easier to meet the girls where they are.  I have found a great connection with some of the other leaders. Leaders are truly wonderful people. 


4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?


I hope girls have learned that they can achieve whatever they put their minds to. My whole troop earned their Bronze Award that required a shift from the original plan because of the pandemic. I hope they learn that creative solutions are solutions. What really made me feel like I was having an impact is when a dad told me that his Middle School daughter in my troop said, "I want to be an engineer just like Marcy."  I have 5 (of my 9 girls) working on their Silver Award. I am hoping they have learned many things from that experience. And I'm looking forward to helping them through their Gold Awards and to take an international trip. There are more things our girls can learn from us, Girls Scouts, and each other than we could ever count. 




Krystal Graham

1.      Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?


7 years ago I became a volunteer to save the troop my 2 daughters were in from disbanding, essentially. I fell in love with the organization and I truly enjoyed working with the girls. I was having as much fun planning the meetings and fun events as the girls were enjoying them. It has been such a reward to go through this journey. 


2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.


I started out being a troop volunteer and just taking my 2 daughters to their meetings while helping out occasionally. I then took on the troop leader role for a few years. 3 years ago I took on the role of Service Unit Manager and I'm also a Cookie Cupboard Manager for Fort Morgan. 

3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?


I've learned so much more than I could ever imagine. Surprisingly, I've learned a lot about myself, more than I thought I would. Girl Scouts provided me with many necessary life skills: going outside of my comfort zone, working hard, managing my time well, and staying positive, I've learned to make empowered decisions and to plan ahead but stay flexible and positive when plans have to change—sometimes that makes for the best memories. Most importantly, I've learned to enjoy the journey.

4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?


I hope the girls learn tenacity, leadership, responsibility, confidence, perseverance,  outdoor, social, entrepreneurial, and life skills. I hope they learn how to manage their time, effectively. I hope they learn how to use the tools around them to accomplish tasks. I hope they learn to step out of their comfort zone and try new things and arent afraid to voice their opinions. I want them to build their self esteem and become empowered young woman who are ambitiously fearless.



Melissa Deal

1.      Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I was a Girl Scout from Brownie to Senior level and received my Gold Award. I have wonderful memories of meeting other girls, making friends, doing quite a bit of outdoor activities and camping and wanted to become a volunteer when my daughter became a Girl Scout so I could support her and other girls by providing them with some of the same experiences.


2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I serve as a Troop Co-Leader and the Troop Cookie Manager. I started out as a troop support volunteer but wanted more interaction and involvement.

3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that I have to slow down and temper my "to do" list. I want to do everything and provide so many experiences for the girls but I have to have a balance as do the girls. I frequentlyhave to take a moment to view the GS experience through their eyes and understand that whatever we are working on is a good place to be and it adds value to their lives.I've also learned that it's hard to wrangle high spirited girls!


4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?


I hope they learn that there are opportunities out there that they never imagined and that they can experience them. I hope they learn to be kind and to work with others despite having differing opinions. 



Heather Zobel

1.      Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer at first to spend more time with my daughter but then it seemed like I adopted a whole flock of girls now. I had been a girl scout and it has been so much fun seeing the changes from when I was a kid, now with my daughter. I love that becoming a volunteer hasn’t been just seeing my own daughter grow and learn skills, it has become watching her grow with other girls. I love getting to work with the girls, helping them learn new things and really see how being in Girl Scouts has impacted their lives as well as my own. 


2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

My first role in becoming a volunteer in troop 13332 started as what the girls dubbed me, “the sewing fairy”. I just started to bring my sewing machine to every meeting so if the girls had patches falling off, or needed a new one to be put on I could do it right there. Now I am taking uniforms home, ordering badges for the girls and making sure their uniforms are correct, up-to-date, and if they are missing anything to replace it. 


My next role was starting to help with badges/ skills and being a person to help other girls get home. That was when my daughter really started to make connections. She gets excited still to see who we are picking up or dropping off now and helps make sure the car is clean to see how many girl scouts can fit in my vehicle. Depending on the event afterwards I sometimes get an extra girl scout to take home now for a random sleep over. 


I was then asked to become a leader last year when we were losing the center of our troop, our Leader, Miss Cara. Since becoming a leader for our troop, I have had so much fun working with the Juniors (and on occasion our Cadettes and Senior) on skill badges and ran the Fall program for 2022. I was a co-cookie manager 2023 and cookie season was a blast as at every booth the girls worked on counting back change, organizing the inventory and how to interact with their customers. Now I have partnered up with 2 leaders in our troop to tackle World thinking day and that has been a fun handful. 

3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned so much, where to begin?? Being a Girl Scout Volunteer has taught me patience, some teaching skills and how to interact better with people in general. I am typically shy around those I don’t know but this troop wouldn’t even know it anymore. Getting to work with the girls, I can see my own growth too in how to approach different things to get the same result and really the biggest thing that it has taught me is how to communicate more with my daughter. With so many girls to talk to, to work with, to have fun with, I have been able to see better ways of talking with my daughter with different things. It has helped our relationship so, so much and I will be forever grateful. 

4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?


I hope that the girls have learned from me is how to be weird and be ok with it.  I hope that they have learned it is ok to ask for help even if it is not about Girl Scouts and that I really am just a phone call or text away. I hope they have learned that sometimes school can be on pause, and it is ok to take a break. I hope they have learned to try new things and it is ok not to like everything. I hope that I have taught them that no goal is unreachable.



Amber Foreman

1.      Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?


I always wanted to be a Girl Scout but never had the opportunity. The only way for my daughter to become a Girl Scout was to become a leader.


2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.


First off, I am a troop leader and I was also the Fall Product Manager. I didn't start off being the Troop Cookie Manager but ended up with the job just a couple of weeks into the season.

3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?


I have learned that every girl learns and experiences everything differently. The world is a big place still full of wonders and the smallest things can bring great joy to a child's heart. Mostly, I have learned patience.


4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?


I hope that my girls have learned that they can do anything they set their minds to. Even though something seems really scary at first, like talking to complete strangers and asking if they want to buy cookies, there are so many possibilities available for them. That sometimes taking a chance can afford them amazing opportunities they wouldn't have had otherwise. I want them to grow up as confident women that believe in themselves.



Heidi Mazur

1.      Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I believe in the Girl Scout program.  I am a Gold Award recipient and a lifetime member.  A few years after college I moved to another state and didn't know very many people.  I decided to become a troop leader (without kids) to get to know others and to grow with the young ladies I helped lead for 12 years.  Then, I had a daughter and moved to Colorado.  When she started kindergarten, I was eager to start my own troop to mentor young ladies and give them some unique experiences. 


2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.


I was a leader of a troop for 12 years before I had kids and was very much involved in that council.  Once my daughter went to kindergarten, I became a leader of a new troop.  A few years later, I eventually became the Service Unit Manager and the Service Unit Cookie Manager.


3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I learned many things like having patience with others, listening to both sides of the story when there's a conflict, challenging the girls to set goals and achieve them, letting the girls help lead the way through the Girl Scout program, and learning to delegate more responsibility to others. 

4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?


Girls can become great leaders with great confidence coming from many great experiences, especially from Girl Scouts.  



Mindolyn Rutter

1.      Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?


I remember how much fun I had when I was in Girl Scouts and I wanted to introduce it to my daughter. It's something we both enjoy being involved in together. 

2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.


I'm part of the leadership team with troop 60035. I'm the troop cookie manager and also the service unit troop cookie manager for service unit 612.


3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

That girls can do anything. It's amazing watching them try new things and succeeding at something they would of never tried on their own. 


4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?


That anything is possible if you put in the work and time to achieve your goals. 



Jennifer Jurgens

1.      Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer because I wanted my girls to have opportunities. I wasn’t able tohave when I was young. I love the Girl Scout program and had many friends that did Girl Scouts growing up and I knew that it was a positive and supportive environment for my girls. I decided as an adult I wanted to be part of that as well and help them grow and also be in a position to be a trusted, female adult for other girls who may not have that.

2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I have helped lead girls from Daisy through Cadet. I have been the fall sales manager for the troop and cookie manager for the troop. I have helped in some mentoring if other troop leaders and volunteered wherever I can when I can on the western slope, so that we can have as much programming as possible for the girls over here. I wish I was in a position to do more!


3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?


I have learned so much being a volunteer over the last several years. I have learned about the power that young women have to enact change be a force for good, and then been privileged to see that firsthand. I have learned that these kids, even asDaisy’s see ways they can make their world a better place. I have learned that yes, girls see a lot of the horror and evil in the world and so many can and are able to find ways to bring kindness and light and hope. They are truly giving and loving and inherently good natured and Girl Scouts helps keep those qualities at the forefront even when there is so much anger, anxiety, and frustration around them. I have learned how to let go and let the girls lead and take charge and seen them grow themselves and grow others in amazing ways. I have learned that when we let them lead they rise to the occasion time and time again and it is beautiful to watch. I have used this approach in my professional life as a special education teacher and also coaching Lego League and seen huge leaps in growth in those areas because of the skills I have gained as a Girl Scout leader. I have learned just how closely the girls watch what we do and not just what we say. They feed off our vibe and our energy. They watch how well we follow the law and promise. They see if we are including others and if we are truly being a sister to every Girl Scout. I have learned how to set better boundaries for myself and how to delegate which I do NOT come by naturally. I am not great at it still but I have accepted that part of being in the sisterhood of Girl Scouts is knowing when to hand things to others so my plate is not overflowing and allowing our leadership team to support each other because none of us can do it all - and we don’t need to. I have been so fortunate to still have the other mom who started our troop with me and we have had babies, loss, jobs, deployments etc. and as we all work together and communicate our needs and our boundaries we work together better as a team and we are showing that to our girls.

4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?


I hope above all else they learned that no matter what, they are loved and needed and wanted just as they are. I hope that they learn that they will always have a cheerleader in their corner - even if sometimes that cheerleader needs to give them some redirection. I hope they know that what they have to give is enough and That they don’t have to do be someone they are not to please other people. I hope they learn they can do whatever they set their minds to and know where to go for help for whatever they may need. I hope they know I love them.





Aimee Rogers

1.      Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?


My oldest daughter came home in 1st grade with an interest card. I had been a Girl Scout for onlly a short amount of time as a child and didn't care for it. I volunteered because no one else would! 

2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.


I am a Leader, Cookie Mom, Service Unit Manager, Mentor and Volunteer trainer, event organizer, recruiter. 


3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

After 13 years as a volunteer guiding the girls through the GSLE, I was surprised to realize that I benefitted from the Girl Scout Leadership Experience along side the girls! Every benefit that the girls got from the program, I experienced as well. It has helped me take more risks and try new things and venture outside of my comfort zone along side my girls.

4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?

How to have fun and laugh! How to try new things. How to expect to make mistakes and learn it is ok to do so. When it is ok  to say no, and when to say yes. 



Melissa Lessard

1.      Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I am a 3rd generation Legacy Girl Scout and had an AMAZING troop all through my childhood.  I have dreamed of being a Girl Scout leader since I got my Gold Award and graduated from high school.  I always hoped I would have a daughter so I could be a Girl Scout leader and I was blessed with 2!  My passion for empowering young girls, my love of nature and the planet, and my vast experience working with young people all made me want to volunteer with as a Girl Scout leader.


2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.


I’m currently the leader of both of my daughter’s troops, along with my co-leaders, who are each good friends.  I also unexpectedly stepped into the role of Service Unit Manager for SU 626, Bear Creek this year.


3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?


I’ve learned just how hard my own Girl Scout leaders worked when I was younger!  Seriously though, there is a lot involved in being a Girl Scout leader but the rewards are vast.  Watching these girls grow up together, work on ideas and projects together, explore the natural world and how it functions (and what consequences there are when it’s disrupted), and just seeing them have so much fun together has been incredible (it’s fun for me too!).  I’ve learned that individually girls can be powerful but together, they are a FORCE to be reckoned with!

4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?


I hope my Scouts are learning to be comfortable and confident in their own skin, just as they are.  I hope they’re learning to think critically about the world while also appreciating the natural beauty of their surroundings.  I hope they learn that they can overcome challenges, they can encourage and build each other up, that it’s okay to try and sometimes fail, and that a positive attitude will take them far in life.



Amanda Hoskins

1.      Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a volunteer with Girl Scouts because girls need to be taught and empowered to be strong women. My daughter has three brothers and no sisters so Girl Scouts has given her wonderful girls to call sisters. 

2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.


I have been a Junior and Cadette troop leader, a fall product manager, a troop cookie manager, and a service unit cookie manager. 

3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned how to work with and love all kinds of girls and other leaders here in Estes Park. Each person has so much to bring to our Girl Scout Community. Even though girls have come and gone, I have thoroughly enjoyed working with each and every one of them.


4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that girls have learned how to make good choices, how to have fun, and how to have dreams, ideas, and visions and to put them into reality.



Kristin Kindred

1.      Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I was so excited to have my daughter join Girl Scouts when she got into Kindergarten, unfortunately, there was no leader for a local troop.  Council reached out and asked me about my Girl Scout experience and I shared that I was a Girl Scout when I was younger and that I was currently a teacher.  They asked me if I would be a leader and the rest is history.

2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.


I started off as a Daisy leader and quickly moved to a multi-level Troop leader.  I am the Troop TCM and Fall Product Manager.  2 years ago our Unit was in need of a Service Unit Leader, so I and two other leaders joined forces and became a Service Unit Team.  I am the Service Unit Fall Products and Cookie Manager.  This last year I split our multi-level troop into two troops as my younger daughter was going to start Girl Scouts and felt it was time to split the levels (Daisy/Brownie and Junior and above).  


3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?


Lots of things, growing strong female leaders in the community, collaborating with other troops, and creating a Service Unit where leaders feel appreciated.


4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?


Have fun in whatever you are doing, stand up for your sister Girl Scout and treat others the way you want to be treated.



Erin Belk

1.      Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?


Our family moved to Colorado almost 2 years ago, and there was a large troop already established at my daughter’s new school.In order for her to join GS, it was necessary for me to volunteer occasionally to help with the ratios, but I ended up enjoying it so much I helped with almost every meeting that first year.I spent most of my childhood in a GS troop where my mom was one of our leaders.I have so many memories of all the different things we experienced, songs we sang, people we met, skills we learned, and places we visited and I wanted to help my daughter and other girls make similar memories.

2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.


We have a multi-level troop of over 30 girls.I started out last year as a parent volunteer with the Daisies in our troop and helped with whatever was needed at our weekly meetings.This year when some of the girls moved up in level or decided to leave our troop, so did their amazing parents.This left me an open spot to become one of the Daisy level leaders. I’ve worked with an awesome co-leader as well as some wonderful parent volunteers to help plan and facilitate our weekly meetings.I’ve helped with some of the administrative duties for the whole troop, such as managing the bank account, ordering badges, and helping to keep everything organized.I also took on the role of Troop Cookie Manager this year, which was a huge learning experience!


3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?


I feel like I learn something new every week!Working with Daisies has taught me to have more patience, to go with the flow, and to just have fun.I remember spending most of our time focusing on outdoor skills and camping when I was in Girl Scouts.There is a much wider range of programming now, so I’ve learned something new from each of the badges the girls have worked on.I’ve also learned a lot from the other volunteers in our troop.Many of them have been volunteering with Girl Scouts for years, and they are full of wisdom and knowledge that they are happy to pass on.

4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?


I hope that the girls I’ve spent time with have learned how they can implement each line of the Girl Scout Law into their everyday lives.That treating others with kindness and compassion is important, and doing things to help others will ultimately help themselves.I hope they know that they are important to this world and can make impactful changes for the better.They can achieve anything in life they want by setting goals, putting in the work, and persevering through challenges and obstacles.



Christian Madrid

1.      Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer because I was a scout with great adult leaders and role models, and my daughter needed a leader to join.


2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.


I have been a leader,co-leader, Aquatics Committee member,  cookie mom, fall sales mom, and here in Colorado part of the service unit team.


3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

As a volunteer I have learned that flexibility is key. It doesn’t matter how much you plan, something always comes up, so having a back up plan x 3 and knowing change is inevitable has been really helpful.


4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls have learned to think and advocate for themselves. I hope they have learned our sisterhood is never closed and that we have enough smarts, dedication, and love to go around and that I always believe in them.



Amy Droitcour

1.      Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

Initially I volunteered because my oldest kid wanted to be a Girl Scout after seeing scouts in a parade, and the recruiter convinced me that I'd make a good Girl Scout leader. While leading, I was really impressed by how powerful it was for kids to be in a group where they get opportunities to make the world a better place and to work together to make decisions and spend their own money. I knew I wanted to be part of bringing that to kids!


2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

It's my fifth year as a troop leader - I started leading my kid's troop as a kindergarten Daisy in Massachusetts, and when we moved to Colorado two years later, I started a new Brownie troop. Now they're 4th grade Juniors! Next year my younger kid starts Kindergarten so I might start leading a second troop!In the first year of the Colorado troop, I really wanted our troop to sell cookies because I had seen how much my Daisies had learned while selling door-to-door and at booths, and I wanted the new troop to get that opportunity as well. It was the 2020-2021 year, so COVID was a huge concern, and parents were understandably hesitant, so I started being the Troop Cookie Manager as well. My service unit hasn't been very active, but seems like it's going to start having meetings, and I'm looking forward to helping out with SU-wide events and getting to know more leaders!


3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?


I've learned that every troop is different - that's part of being Girl Led! Being a troop leader is less work and more rewarding than I expected when I started. My favorite part that I didn't anticipate is that being part of our troop connects me to my community and enables me to give back to my community, and that feels really good!


4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?

During the COVID years we met outside all year around, sometimes in wind and snow storms, and in winter sometimes with our only light from camping lanterns. Now my scouts know they can get through anything - at least as long as they wear the right gear!


On a more serious note, the biggest thing I hope they learn from scouting is that they each have the power to make a difference and make the world a better place. Their opinions and ideas matter, and they can learn how to channel their energy to change anything they put their minds to. 



Elisa Loper

1.      Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

Last year, we moved to Lake City, CO, from a suburb in Houston, TX. My daughter was in Girl Scouts in TX, and she really enjoyed it! She is very shy but enjoyed the program. There was not a troop in Lake City when we arrived; the closest one was 55 miles away. So, I decided to start a troop (Ashley Virgin was amazing at helping make this an easy process)! I knew this program could be a great fit for a small community for so many reasons. The multi-level structure seemed like it could work great for girls who are used to being grouped together. As a remote mountain town, developing outdoor skills seems highly relevant. Also, I love the sisterhood and confidence that Girl Scouts instills!


We had our first meeting in November of 2022. I was so unsure of how it would be received, but our multi-level troop, which has girls from grades 2-12, has 8 girls enrolled (and one more pending!). I'm so amazed because the school my oldest daughter and two sons attend only has 80 students! With one exception, every girl in her class is a Girl Scout.

I also really love Girl Scout cookies! Obviously I love to eat them, but I also LOVE the financial literacy, money management, and other skill building it fosters.  My daughter loved selling cookies in Texas; I was beside myself at how my shy daughter came out of her shell during cookie season to promote a program and product she loved. We saw the same here in Colorado. The girls in our troop had a great time loading cookies at school basketball games, door-to-door with the boxes loaded on a sled, at a booth set up frozen lake, and in other creative ways. I'm amazed that we sold 705 boxes this season! Our town only has 400 full time residents!

2.      Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I am a troop leader, the TCM for our troop, and the SUCM for our Service Area (which is sort of by default because we are the only troop in the service area). I plan our meetings and, along with my co-leader, lead the girls through the activities. "Girl-led choice" is one of the things I really emphasize in our troop. I like to think of myself as the facilitator; it's the girls who lead the way with major decisions! 

3.      What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?


Even seemingly small things can have a big impact! I'm proud of all we are accomplishing this year with our girls We've earned First Aid, Snack, New Cuisines, My Cookie Customers, Cookie Decision Making, and Cookie Market Researcher badges and have a few planned for the next couple months. We've visited the local medical center, hosted a guest speaker from our county's Search and Rescue, and I have learned a lot from these experiences alongside the girls. I still feel, though, like the program is in its infancy and will grow to be more in the coming years. I also volunteer at the local school quite a bit, and one day as I was visiting the lunch room, a group of girls invited me to their table. They told me about how much they LOVED Girl Scouts, how important it was to them, and how much they look forward to every meeting. One girl even told me, "My little sister can't wait to join, but she won't be old enough for a few years. That'sok, because Girls Scouts is ME time!" I realized that what seems small to me is actually really meaningful to them! 


4.      What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the badges we complete are a good learning touchpoint for them. Hopefully they are learning skills that deepen as they grow. Hopefully, through what they are learning through Girl Scouts, they can identify some of their own interests and talents and cultivate them within and beyond the program. I would love to have the girls reflect back on their childhood and recall this program as a stepping stone to relevant topics. It would be great if they could look back and say "I learned about this in Girl Scouts!" 



Jenna Wilkin

1. Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?


I have always loved the mission of Girl Scouts and the amazing opportunities, experiences and growth that girls have when they are in the program. I became a Girl Scout volunteer when my daughter's (who was a Daisy at the time) troop leader asked me to be TCM.


2. Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

When I was the troop TCM, I couldn't believe the incredible amount of effort that went into organizing cookie season, but also saw the powerful impact that selling cookies had on my daughter. At one King Sooper's booth, my kid went from whispering "cookies?" to an empowered "Girl Scout cookies are the best! Try the new ones! Want to get another box for your kids?"

I ended up starting a new troop at my daughter's school and was both troop leader and TCM. I was completely hooked on helping during cookie season and soon became the Service Unit Cookie Manager for SU 644. I LOVED meeting, learning from, and supporting all the other cookie parents working on cookie season in their own troops. I soon decided that it was a GREAT idea to park my car outside during the worst of winter and stand in my garage semi-frozen while handing out cases of cookies for hours as the Lowry cookie cupboard manager. I have loved each of my volunteer roles, but there is something about being the cookie cupboard manager that is so fun, challenging and exhausting - it's such a fun volunteer role and I hope to continue it for years to come.

For me, Girls Scouts opens up an entirely new world for each girl. It gives them endless opportunities for meaningful experiences, growth and empowerment. I love being a part of something so life changing and look forward to seeing how the innovative new GSCO programs will continue to build on an already incredible foundation.


3. What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I learn each day that I work in my volunteer roles for Girl Scouts. For cookie season, I have learned that selling cookies is so much more than just "selling cookies". It's about confidence, commitment, planning, organizing, learning, celebrating and more.

I have learned that the potential of these girls is limitless. I have learned that parents of Girl Scouts are hardworking, creative, loving and growth oriented and they want to pass that on to their girls. I have learned that there is tremendous kindness in the world and I'm still grateful to the parents who helped me move endless cases of cookies so I would be able to park in my garage.

One of my favorite things to point out is that during the worst of Covid, the NBA stopped playing, theaters went dark, concerts were cancelled, major world events were cancelled - but cookie season persevered! The Girl Scouts didn't miss a season and provided a sense of normalcy in crazy crazy times. What a lesson for the girls! No matter what's going on - bring your greatness wherever you go.


4. What do you hope girls have learned from you?


Such an interesting question... not many girls come to the cupboard and I don't have much interaction in my SUCM role. I guess I would say that I hope they learn how many people are out there supporting them and to appreciate all the effort that their caregivers are putting in to make their experience great.

As a troop leader, I hope they learned from me how amazing and interesting the world can be. I hope they learned that there is so much out there for them to explore and if they are willing to share their ideas and maybe go a little outside of their comfort zone - they can have the most incredible experiences and grow from there.

I hope that I have been a good example of the ideals of the Girl Scout Law and that I have inspired them to continue in their Girl Scout journeys.



Patricia Maes

1. Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?


When my daughter was in second grade, her leader moved to Denver and she really, really wanted to continue, so I stepped up and continued the troop with a fellow volunteer.


2. Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.


I started out as an assistant leader because we had a huge troop at the time. When that leader left, I became the main leader as well as the cookie volunteer. I continued that throughout the entire time my daughter was a Girl Scout and I continued after my daughter graduated, mainly because I promised our youngest girl and her mom that I would be there for them as long as they need me.


3. What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?


I learned how to stand up in front of a group and how to advocate for myself. I also learned how to manage the girls to make them more independent and to speak up for themselves. I discovered that I am better with a smaller group and it’s so much easier to get the shyer girls to stand up for themselves and make their wishes known when the group was six girls or less. I learned that teens very often do actually know more than we think they do. Now that they are in high school, we talk about our weeks and they have helped me navigate some work situations.


4. What do you hope girls have learned from you?


I hope they have learned that their thoughts and opinions are valuable. I’ve seen all of them grow up to be very self reliant young adults who are able to advocate for themselves.








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